Category Newborns

Cry Baby program
Newborns

Cry Baby program

Cry Baby: help for baby sleep and crying Cry Baby is an evidence-based program for parents of infants aged less than 12 weeks of age. The program provides you with information and advice about: the early steps you can take to set up good long-term sleep habits in your infant normal infant crying and how to cope with crying.

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Newborns

Newborn behaviour: an overview

Understanding your newborn baby's behaviour Cuddling, sleeping, feeding, crying. That's what newborn behaviour is all about in the first few months. Although your baby might give you some eye contact, crying is probably the main thing you'll notice about his behaviour. For example, he'll cry if he's hungry, unsettled, wet or uncomfortable.
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Newborns

Cry Baby program

Cry Baby: help for baby sleep and crying Cry Baby is an evidence-based program for parents of infants aged less than 12 weeks of age. The program provides you with information and advice about: the early steps you can take to set up good long-term sleep habits in your infant normal infant crying and how to cope with crying.
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Newborns

Infant formula: making, storing and transporting it

Preparing water for baby formula When you're preparing baby formula, the first step is to always wash your hands with soap. It's also important to make sure you use a clean area to prepare the formula. Next, boil fresh tap water in an electric jug or on the stove top. In places with a clean water supply that meets Australian standards, hot water urns like hydroboils are also safe to use for preparing formula.
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Newborns

Bottle-feeding babies: giving the bottle

About bottle-feeding If your baby can't always feed directly from your breast, you might choose to bottle-feed her expressed breastmilk. This will keep up your milk supply and make sure baby gets the benefits of breastmilk. Or you might need to feed your baby infant formula, which is the only safe alternative to breastmilk.
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Newborns

Breastfeeding attachment techniques

Breastfeeding attachment: getting started Learning to breastfeed can take time, practice and patience. Finding an attachment technique that works for you and your baby can make all the difference. If you'd like some help with breastfeeding, breastfeeding techniques or breastfeeding attachment, your midwife, child and family health nurse or GP or the Australian Breastfeeding Association (ABA) can support you.
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Newborns

Bottle-feeding: cleaning and sterilising equipment

Bottle-feeding equipment If you're bottle-feeding your baby, you'll need: 4-6 large bottles rings and caps several teats. You can use any bottle your baby seems to like, because none is better than any other. Teats are either made from latex (brown) or silicone (clear), and either kind is fine. Try teats with bigger or smaller holes until you find one that you and your baby are happy with.
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Newborns

How to increase milk supply

Not enough breastmilk: getting help If you'd like some help with breastfeeding, support services are available. Your midwife, child and family health nurse or GP or the Australian Breastfeeding Association (ABA) can support you with breastfeeding your baby. They can also help you find a lactation consultant if you need one.
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Newborns

Newborn screening

What is newborn screening? Newborn screening is a simple blood test that helps doctors identify rare but serious conditions . The test is done within three days after your baby's birth, before symptoms are obvious. This is so treatment can start before a condition causes problems. Newborn screening can pick up signs of more than 25 rare conditions.
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Newborns

Blocked milk ducts, mastitis and breast abscess

Getting help for mastitis and blocked milk ducts If you'd like some help with breastfeeding, support services are available. Your midwife, child and family health nurse, GP or the Australian Breastfeeding Association (ABA) can support you with breastfeeding your baby. They can also help you find a lactation consultant if you need one.
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Newborns

Expressing and storing breastmilk

Expressing breastmilk and storing breastmilk: the basics Expressing breastmilk is when you take milk out of your breast. You might want to express your breastmilk because your breasts feel swollen or engorged or because you want to have some breastmilk stored in the fridge or freezer for using at a later time.
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Newborns

Dressing a newborn

Newborn clothes: sizes Size 000 is intended to fit babies from 0-3 months, and size 00 is for babies from 3-6 months. Some bigger newborns might be ready to go straight into a size 00. You might have to roll the sleeves up, but it won't be for long. Sizes vary between types of clothes and manufacturers, so it's worth comparing clothes to other garments you already have, rather than relying only on the size on the label.
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Newborns

0-1 month: newborn development

Newborn development at 0-1 month: what's happening Cuddling, sleeping, feeding. That's what it's all about in the first few months. Your baby is also learning a lot as you spend time together every day. Her brain is growing and developing as she sees, hears and touches the world around her. Your baby might be able to follow your face with his eyes.
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Newborns

Umbilical care

Your baby's umbilical stump: what to expect After your baby's birth, her umbilical cord is cut. Your midwife puts a plastic clamp or tie on the stump that's left behind. The clamp is taken off after a day or two, when the umbilical stump has dried and sealed. During the first few days after birth, the stump will get darker and shrivel, and will eventually fall off .
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Newborns

Breast refusal and baby biting breast

Getting help for breast refusal and baby biting breast If you'd like some help with breastfeeding, support services are available. Your midwife, child and family health nurse or GP or the Australian Breastfeeding Association (ABA) can support you with breastfeeding your baby. They can also help you find a lactation consultant if you need one.
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Newborns

Sore nipples and nipple infections

Sometimes breastfeeding mums have issues with sore nipples and nipple infections. If you have sore nipples, start by checking your baby's breastfeeding attachment. For a nipple infection, you need to see your GP. Getting help for sore nipples and nipple infections If you'd like some help with breastfeeding, support services are available.
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Newborns

Bonding and attachment: newborns

About bonding and attachment with newborns Bonding and attachment is about always responding to your newborn's needs with love, warmth and care. When you do this, you become a special, trusted person in your baby's life. Bonding between you and your newborn is a vital part of development . For example, when your newborn gets what she needs from you, like a smile, a touch or a cuddle, she feels the world is a safe place to play, learn and explore.
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Newborns

Bathing a newborn

How often to give your newborn a bath A bath 2-3 times a week is enough to keep your newborn clean. But if your baby really likes baths, you can bath him once a day. Bathing more than this can dry out your baby's skin. You can keep your baby's genitals clean between baths by using warm water and cotton wool.
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Newborns

Dental care for newborns

Baby teeth development Babies are born with a full set of 20 baby teeth hidden in their gums - 10 up the top and 10 down the bottom. As each baby tooth gets to the surface of the gum, the gum opens up to show the tooth. Most first teeth appear between 6 and 10 months , but children get teeth at different times.
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Newborns

1-2 months: newborn development

Newborn development at 1-2 months: what's happening Around this time, most babies might cry and fuss more - this is a normal part of development and will pass in time. Every baby is different, but crying and fussing usually peaks around 6-8 weeks and starts to settle at around 12-16 weeks. Your baby has made a strong bond with you already - she recognises you and responds to your voice and smile.
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Newborns

2-3 months: newborn development

Newborn development at 2-3 months: what's happening Your baby is two months old, going on three - where does the time go? At this age your baby understands that voices and faces go together - especially yours. That's because she has formed a strong attachment to you. She might follow you with her eyes and enjoy smiling at you.
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